Can Stay-at-Home Parents Get Monthly Disability Benefits?

stay-at-home parents

It isn’t easy for stay-at-home parents to qualify for Social Security disability benefits — but help is still available for some. To qualify for monthly disability benefits from the Social Security Administration (SSA), you must meet medical and non-medical eligibility requirements. If you’re facing serious financial hardship due to a disability, you likely already meet some or all non-medical eligibility requirements. One example would be if you’re recently widowed and have no other income sources available for your family.



Medical Eligibility Requirements for Stay-at-Home Parents Claiming Disability Benefits

Because each SSA-administered disability program lists different qualifications, your circumstances dictate which benefits you may receive. However, both programs use the same medical requirements listed below to screen every applicant:

  • First, your condition must meet the SSA’s definition of a disability;
  • Second, your disability must be expected to last for 12 continuous months or result in your death;
  • Third, you must receive ongoing treatment from an acceptable healthcare provider or physician for your disabling condition; and
  • Lastly, you must prove you cannot work or perform your usual job tasks directly as a result of your disability.

Stay-at-home parents and homemakers who meet the above requirements are much more likely to qualify for disability benefits. Next, we’ll explain non-medical requirements for each program that may help stay-at-home parents with disabilities make ends meet.

How Stay-at-Home Parents May Qualify for Supplemental Security Income

Homemakers and stay-at-home parents who haven’t worked for five years or longer may qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). The SSA uses strict income and asset limits to determine whether applicants meet non-medical eligibility requirements for monthly SSI benefits. You must meet all the non-medical SSI eligibility requirements listed below before you apply in order to qualify:

  • Blind applicants must receive less than $1,950 per month in earned and unearned income combined to qualify for SSI. And if you’re disabled (but not blind), your monthly income must be less than $1,170 in 2017 ($1,180 in 2018). Unearned income includes unemployment checks, Social Security retirement benefits, alimony and child support payments, gifts, free food and shelter, etc.
  • Next, single parents must have less than $2,000 in countable resources available (the upper limit for married couples is $3,000). Countable resources include your retirement, checking, and savings account balances, and anything you own and can easily sell for cash. Homeowners may still qualify for SSI, since the SSA doesn’t count your house and one vehicle towards your resource limits.
  • You must also be a U.S. citizen or non-citizen who falls under the Department of Homeland Security’s “qualified alien” category.

Once you’ve met these qualifications, the SSA reviews your condition to ensure it meets their very strict disability requirements. If you’re approved for SSI, your check amount may vary depending on which state you live in. The maximum SSI payment amount is $735 for individuals, and $1,103 for couples, but several U.S. states provide supplemental benefits. To see if your state offers supplemental SSI benefits, click here.

Stay-at-Home Parents May Have a Harder Time Qualifying for SSDI

To personally qualify for Social Security disability insurance (SSDI) benefits, you must have an eligible disability and substantial work history. But if your spouse (or ex-spouse) dies, you may be eligible for SSDI based on the deceased individual’s work history. For widowed or divorced stay-at-home parents to qualify for a deceased former spouse’s monthly SSDI checks, they must:

  • Have children under age 16 living in the same home
  • Be at least 50 years old
  • Have not yet remarried

For you to personally meet all non-medical SSDI eligibility requirements using your own Social Security work credits, you must:

  • Be a U.S. citizen who’s over 18, but haven’t yet reached your full retirement age
  • Have worked 5 in the last 10 years full-time if you’re over age 30; younger disabled stay-at-home parents, click here
  • Your employer(s) must have withheld FICA taxes from previous paychecks that paid directly into the Social Security disability insurance fund

If the SSA approves your SSDI claim, your monthly payment amount varies based on your previous highest earnings history. So your salary totaled over $100k annually for several years, you may qualify for the maximum SSDI payment of $2687/month.

Stay-at-Home Parents May Also Qualify for Free Legal Assistance

The best way for stay-at-home parents to get any benefits they’re rightfully owed quickly is by consulting an experienced advocate. Disability laws vary by state, and filing a disability benefits claim can be difficult as well as confusing. In fact, the SSA denies 75% of first-time applicants who file a claim. Some people who make simple mistakes filling out their forms forms get turned down, even though they’re eligible for benefits. That’s why we provide free, no-obligation legal consultations to anyone who needs help filing their initial disability claim. Stay-at-home parents who want to get pre-qualified for disability benefits online before they apply should click the button below now.

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